Archive for the ‘Production’ Category

Cameo Enters the Video App Filmmaking Market

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

Cameo is the latest addition to the video plus social networking app market. As with every new release into this crowded marketplace – users will ask (in a whining voice) – what’s new and different than Vine, Instagram, YouTube Capture, and all the others? Answer: A lot! First, Cameo vids are cloud based – all videos are stored in the Cloud (for free). It does not use the space in your phone (unless you want the final product to be there). Nice, but what else you got? Cameo allows users to shoot 720p HD (mp4 format) videos on their iPhones or iPads (requires iOS 7) with up to three friends – giving users the ability to collaborate, in real time. They also have a fully functional editing suite and a library of effects like 16 and 35mm, colors and themes like Luminous, Analog, Pop, Chromatic, and much more.

Users can make 2 minute short films with 6 second clips at a time (this gives Vine veterans the skill-set to expand their limited 6 second creations). You can also trim the 6 sec clips to utilize the most relevant parts and edit them all together.

Check out their intro video:


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Cameo allows you to easily create beautiful short films on your own or with friends. Cameo is the first app to bring professional-grade video effects and styles to users of any skill level. Download now and get creative.

  • Unlimited video creation
  • Free professional-grade effects and fonts
  • Film in real-time with friends
  • Instantly share on Cameo as well as Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr
  • 720p HD video is embeddable on any website or blog
  • Save HD videos to your phone so you can upload to YouTube, Vimeo, or Instagram
  • Cloud storage so video clips don’t take up space on your phone
  • Follow friends and other creators
  • Like and comment on each other’s Cameos

–from official Cameo page on Apple iTunes App store.
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You can download the Cameo app for free at the Apple iTunes App store.

App-Only Filmmaking – Trend, Gimmick or Evolution of the Medium?

Monday, July 29th, 2013

“Haunting Melissa” is a unique filmmaking endeavor created by producer Neal Edelstein (The Ring, Mulholland Drive) and Hooked Digital Media. The horror app-only film is specifically made for viewing on iPads and iPhones (iOS6). The episodic structure delivers chapters, piece-by-piece in an unexpected schedule – heightening the tension of the horror tale through push notifications. Because of the nature of the mobile device platform, the “film” exploits the intimate nature of how we consume sound in these devices – i.e. headphones  – emphasizing this traditional ghost story’s details into a modern digital era experience.

See the trailer here…

 

“Haunting Melissa” is an example of the evolution of mobile app usage in filmmaking. We’ve seen its use primarily as a second screen experience like in the Dutch film App (filmlinker article), Tender Loving Care, and in several TV shows like AMC’s Story-Synch features for The Walking Dead and The Killing.  Here’s a chart (below) from a Wall Street Journal article titled, “TV Networks Play to ‘Second Screen” that shows the ever changing, multi-tasking viewer:


       Source: WSJ.com

Hooked Digital Media is betting on this trend to grow and evolve into a new way audiences experience storytelling.

Expect original stories exclusively for tablet and mobile devices through app technology that reinvents distribution. The hyper and hungry audiences of today can expect edgy and innovative entertainment from some of Hollywood’s best and brightest creators… The way entertainment is absorbed has changed forever. So let us tell you a story.” – hookeddigitalmedia.com/about

Download the [highlight]FREE APP[/highlight] for “Haunting Melissa” in the iTunes Store now.

Screenshots of the “Haunting Melissa” app:

Prototype – The Search for the Next Great Filmmaker

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Prototype is an exciting new film competition from Break Media. The competition is looking for science-fiction, action and FX genre filmmakers. Eight finalists will receive $20,000 in production funding to make their short films. One grand-prize winner will be awarded a writing & directing feature film deal with New Regency.

The Phases

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From now until August 31, submit your action, sci-fi, or effects-driven short film script; a treatment for the feature version of your film; and a sample of your directing work.

They will be evaluating projects on a rolling basis, so the sooner you submit, the sooner you’ll be in the running to receive $20,000 in production funding and the chance to win a feature film development deal with New Regency Productions.
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Eight finalists will be announced in mid-September and will be awarded $20,000 each to produce their short films.

Stay tuned throughout the production process for updates, photos and interviews from set and much more, all leading up to the premiere of the eight finalist films.
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Tune in for the world premiere of the eight Prototype short films in Early 2014.

The films will be distributed across Break Media’s digital audience of over 70 Million viewers.
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They will announce the Prototype Grand Prize Winner in the Spring of 2014.

The winner will receive a writing & directing deal with New Regency Productions to develop their vision into a full length feature film.
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[source: BreakMedia]

 

The Steps

Here’s what you’ll need to submit:[framed_box]

  • Short Film Script – A five – ten page action, sci-fi, or effects driven short film script that is shoot-able for $20,000.
  • Feature Film Treatment – A 1-15 page treatment for the feature version of your short. A “look-book” that shows more of your vision is optional.
  • Directing Sample – A sample of your work – can be a short film, a reel, anything that shows us you can direct.[/framed_box]
[source: BreakMedia]

 

More Info:

 

Submit now!

Top Filmmaking Pinterest Boards and Pins

Saturday, May 18th, 2013

At this point in time, everyone’s probably heard of Pinterest — the pinboard/scrapbook photo-sharing website that allows users to create theme-based “boards” by “pinning” image or video collections found on the web. There are a lot of Pinterest profiles and boards dedicated to film/cinema/movies, but I’ll only focus on the ones that are specific to filmmaking. Here are the best ones I found…

Cinescopophilia (cinescopophilia.com)


Ted Hope (film producer)


dbykov (art director, designer)


Abelcine


Shootblue (digital cinematography equipment based in London)


Tierible (Thierry Saint-Paul – Filmmaker, Cinematographer)


The Black and Blue (Evan Luzi – Camera Assistant and author)


Red Rock Micro (sells cinema accessories)


Roger Duck (video producer, web developer, and marketer)


Peter Feuersenger (digital producer)


Ben Mallaby (Director and Cinematographer)


MORE USEFUL BOARDS:

Free Producer’s Master Class with Ted Hope and Christine Vachon

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Chris Jones – who runs workshops at the Guerrilla Film Makers Master Class just made available the 4-hour Producers Master Class seminar, titled, American Independents Day in London with veteran indie producers, Ted Hope [IMDB] and Christine Vachon [IMDB]. They’ve both produced 68 films each – so they obviously have a lot to teach us.

You can get all four hours/parts HERE (for free) – all you have to do is register an account on their site.

Here’s the first hour:

Here’s some of the eye-opening insights that they discussed:

What is the film business? The film business is about people keeping their jobs. That’s the most important thing by anyone who is employed in the film business. Not getting your movie made. Not getting an audience for your film…”  — Ted Hope – On how to strategize the production of your film – knowing their primary agenda is an advantage on how to approach it with your project.

Filmmakers are still seeing the web [production or distribution] as the second best [option] or a failure – the same way that they looked at TV a few years ago… now it’s astonishing how many A-list directors are directing their first television pilots… Scorecese with Boardwalk Empire, Jonathan Demme, David Fincher… it’s no longer a ghetto if you’re in director jail.” – Christine Vachon  – In reference to producing and distributing to the web.. Vachon uses Vuguru as an example of a web production company that she’s currently working with on some projects.

Here’s the outline of the first part/hour:
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0.20 Introduction of Ted Hope & Christine Vachon
1.30 Killer Films and how Christine started producing films.
4.30 How to find an audience for you’re film.
6.30 How to produce lots of films regularly & why its important to make the right choices.
9.20 The making of a horror film and how to make a B movie.
13.50 Why ignorance is bliss and how direct contact with industry professionals pays!
16.00 Lessons learnt and why its important to go out to film festivals.
19.05 The film Super and how to negotiate your terms.
20.40 How fear is the key ingredient to making films & why its good to keep an open mind to do things in a different way or platform.
23.35 Online film platforms and the benefits from distributing online.
27.25 The importance defining a brand & how to make a living out of making films.
31.30 Ways of getting an audience for your low budget film & the importantance of communicating through different platfroms.
34.50 Why you can expand your brand into different genres & how it is easy to get trapped.
36.30 How to find the right producer for you & why its about finding the right fit for that project.
39.45 Why it’s important to play the long game in working with collaborators.
43.00 How collaboration teams are the way of the future & why you should have a wide range of collaborators.
46.20 Legal issues and how to get your project permitted.
49.00 How online video on demand services have changed the model of distribution.
51.25 How does online platforms effect the way we tell stories.
53.00 Why making content for platforms like Hulu can benefit your career.
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Get access to all the four parts/hours at americanindependentsday.com.

Photo above from Andy Wright of Evermore Films (who attended the seminar and wrote about his experience here).

SoShare Your Large Media Files For Free

Monday, February 18th, 2013

SoShare is a new free file sharing/delivery service (currently in public Beta) that works through BitTorrent. You can send as many large video, audio and image files, or any other type of file – up to a terabyte of data in each transfer. All for free! The only limit that I can see is that the files are only available for 30 days.

“With SoShare, you can send files of any size. You can collaborate on media projects with friends and co-workers. Ideas are free. And so is SoShare. There are no caps or size limits on creativity.” – from official SoShare site.

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Summary Highlights:

  • Send bundles up to a terabyte in size, totally free.
  • Sharing is as easy as email. They get the files, you get a receipt.
  • The SoShare plug-in enables pause/resume and fast transfers.

After you sign up [highlight]here[/highlight] – you’ll need to download their plug-in.

Check it out.

12 TED Talks on The Power of Film

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

This is a new playlist (TED’s collections of talks around a topic) that focuses on a theme that we all appreciate: The Power of Film.

“These carefully curated talks emphasize the evocative medium of film — be it to convey emotion, to protest, to educate or simply to entertain.” Few things are as magical as sitting back in a theater with a hushed crowd to enjoy a film, but what you see on the screen isn’t everything. Hear from visionaries — from Hollywood, Bollywood, Nollywood — on how to make movies.” – Curated by TED – from “The power of film (12 talks)

There are over 3 hours of “talks” here – averaging about 16 minutes each. Definitely worth your time. Check it out…

Here are the 12 Talks (Curated by TED):

1. Andrew Stanton: The clues to a great story (19:16)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Filmmaker Andrew Stanton (“Toy Story,” “WALL-E”) shares what he knows about storytelling — starting at the end and working back to the beginning.

2. Rob Legato: The art of creating awe (16:27)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Rob Legato creates movie effects so good they (sometimes) trump the real thing. In this warm and funny talk, he shares his vision for enhancing reality on-screen in movies like Apollo 13, Titanic and Hugo.

3. JJ Abrams: The mystery box (18:02)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
J.J. Abrams traces his love for the unseen mystery –- a passion that’s evident in his films and TV shows, including Cloverfield, Lost and Alias — back to its magical beginnings.

4. Adam Sadowsky engineers a viral music video (14:28)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
The band “OK Go” dreamed up the idea of a massive Rube Goldberg machine for their next music video — and Adam Sadowsky’s team was charged with building it. He tells the story of the effort and engineering behind their labyrinthine creation that quickly became a YouTube sensation.

5. Beeban Kidron: The shared wonder of film (13:12)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Movies have the power to create a shared narrative experience and to shape memories and worldviews. British film director Beeban Kidron invokes iconic film scenes — from Miracle in Milan to Boyz n the Hood — as she shows how her group FILMCLUB shares great films with kids.

6. James Cameron: Before Avatar … a curious boy (17:08)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
James Cameron’s big-budget (and even bigger-grossing) films create unreal worlds all their own. In this personal talk, he reveals his childhood fascination with the fantastic — from reading science fiction to deep-sea diving — and how it ultimately drove the success of his blockbuster hits “Aliens,” “The Terminator,” “Titanic” and “Avatar.”

7. Shekhar Kapur: We are the stories we tell ourselves (21:14)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Where does creative inspiration spring from? At TEDIndia, Hollywood/Bollywood director Shekhar Kapur (“Elizabeth,” “Mr. India”) pinpoints his source of creativity: sheer, utter panic. He shares a powerful way to unleash your inner storyteller.

8. Ed Ulbrich: How Benjamin Button got his face (18:07)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Ed Ulbrich, the digital-effects guru from Digital Domain, explains the Oscar-winning technology that allowed his team to digitally create the older versions of Brad Pitt’s face for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.”

9. Adam Savage: My obsession with objects and the stories they tell (15:38)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Adam Savage talks about his fascination with the dodo bird, and how it led him on a strange and surprising double quest. It’s an entertaining adventure through the mind of a creative obsessive.

10. Deborah Scranton on her “War TApes” (17:36)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Filmmaker Deborah Scranton talks about and shows clips from her documentary The War Tapes, which puts cameras in the hands of soldiers fighting in Iraq.

11. David Hoffman on losing everything (04:00)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Nine days before TED2008, filmmaker David Hoffman lost almost everything he owned in a fire that destroyed his home, office and 30 years of passionate collecting. He looks back at a life that’s been wiped clean in an instant — and looks forward.

12. Franco Sacchi tours Nigeria’s booming Nollywood (17:34)  [icon style=”link” color=”blue”][/icon]
Zambia-born filmmaker Franco Sacchi tours us through Nollywood, Nigeria’s booming film industry (the world’s 3rd largest). Guerrilla filmmaking and brilliance under pressure from crews that can shoot a full-length feature in a week.

20 of the Best Filmmaking Related Infographics

Monday, January 21st, 2013

Infographics are not only informative but also fun! They cover every topic from science to pop-culture (movies are prominent in this category – especially Star Wars– here’s one about how to defend the Death Star).

In maintaining the niche of Filmlinker, here are the best “filmmaking” Infographics (click on each thumbnail for the full picture):

“I want to make…”

Here are 4 great “I want to make…” infographics created by Canal+

Technical…

The next set of infographics are more in the “technical” side of filmmaking.

Scene Anatomy (Inglorious Basterds – Infographic by Jordan Anderson

First, we have a breakdown of a Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds. It dissects Scene 1 from 2:06-21:20.  It breaks down the shots, characters, dialogue, etc. – every detail you can think of in a fun, graphical concept.

Next, we have “Inside the DIY Filmmakers Toolkit” by Wistia.  The tools of the trade for every low-budget indie filmmaker.  From the handheld camera to the wheel chair dolly.  All in an interesting artful representation.

DIY Filmmakers Toolkit by Wistia

And… a graphical depiction of the lessor known crew positions on a movie set – by Oxymoron Entertainment.

Lessor Known Jobs in a movie by Oxymoron Entertainment

Even more technical…

Source: Awn.com

The next one is titled, “Machines in Movies.” It’s not the Terminator. It illustrates the computing power that is behind big-budget films (designed by Brocade).

What exactly is IMAX?  This one explains it all!

Source: VizWorld

source: sortable.com

Have you thought about making a 3-D movie? This next one titled, “3-D Bubble” explains its history (where its been and where its going), the business and how 3-d works.

Film Careers…

The next series looks at working in the film industry.

Source: FilmSource

Let’s start with a humorous look at “what’s your place in the film industry?”

source: GetInMedia

Here’s a more serious look at a career in film – from the folks at GetInMedia.com. It lists basically every professional job – and asks, “Where do you fit in?”

source: Yodi Group

And another… “Film Careers: Where to Begin.”

Film Industry…

Source: tdylf.com

This set covers business side of things – movie money, distribution, ratings, etc. – you get the picture (no pun intended).

First, IMDB – “By the Numbers” – (Facts and Figures About the Films that Populate the Internet Movie Database).

source: Dr4ward

Another “money” one – “Reel Dollars – The Flow Of Money Though the Film Industry.”

Next – “The Advent of Online Film Distribution.”

source: Yekra

And for the funny one from Collegehumor.com on “How Movie Ratings Actually Work.” Here’s an excerpt on what PG-13 actually means:

You can still show PG-13 movies on cable without editing them, making this a completely meaningless designation. Probably more violence than sex.”

  Historical…

The final 3 infographics will illustrate a historical look at the first filmmakers, how editing evolved and an interactive look at the history of film.

The The Lumière brothers, Auguste and Louis were  known as the first filmmakers.  This graphic celebrates their 150th anniversary and their contribution to Cinema.

Next is “Quick Facts: Editing – by The Art of Guillotine.”  This one goes through the “first cut” in the silent film days to the modern day.  It describes the different eras and the different editing styles that make up the art that is editing film.

And finally, I’ll end this post with “The History of Film: 2,000 Films, 20 Genres, 100 Years.” This is an interactive look at 100 years of film. Just click on the image and then scroll over the graphic for all the info.

 

That’s 20 infographics! Do you have one that I missed?

 

JuntoBox Films Can Green-light Your Film

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

JuntoBox Films is a collaborative film studio and social media platform that allows filmmakers to pitch their ideas and have film fans rate & vote on projects that can ultimately be funded, produced and distributed. To get started, create a project and profile in the JuntoBox platform. This is where you’ll present ideas to the JuntoBox Films Collective (see their “How-to Junto”).

Filmmakers will then rise up through the Five Levels of development by building their film’s profile through fan participation and completion of various tasks. When a project has risen to the top of the JuntoBox ladder, it is eligible for development. JuntoBox Film’s co-chair – actor, producer and director, Forest Whitaker recently announced that they will be funding and green-lighting five films in 2012!

JuntoBox’s 5 Levels

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images/illustrations from juntoboxfilms.com

Beyond a business, JuntoBox is aspiring to be part of a new business culture that aligns talented people in need of support with accomplished mentors who want to give something back and encourage the stars of the next generation.” — JuntoBox founder Philippe Caland

The success of this type of initiative is crucial to the development of truly independent films. Check it out, sign up and and show your support by pitching your film idea and/or rating other’s projects.

Mobcaster is Crowdfunding Indie TV

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Mobcaster is another crowd-funding site, but specializes exclusively on indie produced television content. It has it’s own online TV channel (Mobcaster TV) – which will broadcast the funded shows’ series and will share ad revenue (50/50 net split) with the show’s creators.

Mobcaster sells advertising around the series broadcast on Mobcaster TV and all Showrunners of such shows are entitled to half of our net advertising revenue. Because Mobcaster TV is dedicated to audience supported (and funded!) TV, Showrunners will have the opportunity for greater revenue participation than nearly anywhere else online!” – from mobcaster.com/faq 

Mobcaster’s biggest success to-date is a show called The Weatherman (watch the pilot episode here). It not only surpassed its $72,500 goal, but it will get a distribution deal with TiVo’s digital streaming service.

I watched The Weatherman pilot episode and it was really funny, well written and produced (by Dark Heart Productions). They are setting the bar pretty high for all the other proposed shows that will try to get funded through Mobcaster.

If you have an idea for a TV show – go ahead and pitch it (free of cost) to the Mobcaster audience. Follow their steps: Pitch -> Fund -> Produce -> Broadcast.